Tag Archive for midterm

Chatting with Sunny

Syracuse Media Group

The inside of Syracuse Media Group, where Sunny works. Taken from Syracuse.com

When choosing a community manager to interview for CMGR class, I knew I wanted to talk to someone local. Syracuse has a great local community based around pride and support of the city. There is a core group of people in Syracuse who love the city and are doing great work to make it a great place to be. Sunny Hernandez is one of those people.

I first learned of Sunny through Twitter, appropriately. She seemed like the person to know, many of the people that I admire were following her and having conversations. I followed her to stay in the loop on local happenings and see how she managed her social media. Sunny gives off this vibe that makes you think that she is a good friend, and I perked up everytime I saw her in my Twitter feed even though I had never formally met her. It made sense that she works for Syracuse.com as a Community Manager, since she is able to easily engage with people through the medium of social media.

Sunny graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Sociology. This degree came in handy in the future as she taught in the area. To raise funding for her program and to raise awareness, she ventured into the world of social media. From there she took off, becoming immersed in the local Twitter community, taking social media focused jobs, and learning about Community Management.

Her current job at Syracuse.com involves managing the Twitter and Facebook accounts, writing community blog posts, and moderating the comments section of the articles. Since Syracuse.com is the largest digital news organization for Central New York, it is up to Sunny and her team to manage the community. Syracuse.com’s digital strategy is transitioning away from solely broadcasting local news and towards being more engaging. With this in mind, Sunny is strategic about the stories that she shares on social media, thinking of what the community would respond well to. I thought it was interesting that she stated that a big part of her job is knowing the community. I never realized to the extent that Community Managers are always mindful of that, and how absolute it is. If you are not familiar with your community, then you will not be able to connect them in the best way possible.

I was also interested to hear that they do use featured posts, where they ask for photos from people in the community to feature. Sunny also will reach out to a community member who has posted a comment on an article, and ask them if they will elaborate on the topic. Sometimes they even have an article of comments that people have posted. These are all great ways to encourage discussion and promote engagement with the community.

Lastly, another interesting point that Sunny brought up was the community guidelines. These are in place to make sure that the comments that people are posting are constructive and appropriate. Surprisingly, it does a lot to help monitor the comments, Sunny refers to it when she has to talk to someone about their unacceptable comment to keep everything under control. She even finds the community self-moderating, politely pointing out the guidelines to each other. This is a sign of a great, constructive community!

It was a pleasure to talk to Sunny and discuss the community-building of Syracuse.com. The one thing that I would recommend, is to hold events to reward community members and foster a stronger sense of community. Making the community more visible and central will bring everyone in the community closer together, and humanize the people behind the posts. Overall, I think they are moving in the right direction towards achieving a close and engaged community.

Video interview

 

Vsnap’s Trish Fontanilla on Being Human

If you ask Trish Fontanilla what Vsnap means to her, she’ll mention the word human at least five times in under one minute.

Which makes sense, since Vsnap is in the business of connecting people. In the words of its website, Vsnap believes “customers are not people.” People, more than anything, are the building blocks of any company, and their feelings and input are as important to any enterprise as hard facts and revenue. As the vice president of community and customer experience, Trish deals directly with making Vsnap—an already personable brand, especially when compared to other business in the marketplace—that much more user-friendly.

And fortunately, I had a chance to speak with Trish and, in turn, got to learn firsthand what it means to be a community manager is, what it isn’t, and what she does to make Vsnap what she’d like to call “a lifestyle brand.”

A conversation with Trish Fontanilla over Google Hangouts.

A conversation with Trish Fontanilla over Google Hangouts.

According to Trish, the confusion between social media managers (SMM) and community managers (CM) is understandable. To clarify, however, she wanted to make the distinctions apparent.

Therefore, in her eyes, a social media manager:

  • Deals explicitly with social media.
  • Exists solely in an online workspace.
  • Often get restrained by email and social media.

A community manager, on the other hand:

  • Uses social media techniques.
  • Reaches out and (physically) goes out.
  • Has greater, personal investment in a company.

As a community manager for a company that already has greater visibility compared to most, Trish turns to people in other communities to help build her own. Aside from being an active member of #CMGRChat, she travels frequently and often shouts out to her followers to see if anyone is available for a real-life meet-up. In a professional capacity, she spearheads Customer Love meet-ups, which focuses on the stories and narratives—not the “slides” and “pitches”—of other CMs and marketing people who, as she says, just “get it.”

Stories, she says, are integral to Vsnap. Since she doesn’t work directly with search engine optimization (SEO), Trish relies on stories from users and other CMs to help gauge “grand sentiment metrics.” After all, Vsnap deals with users on a person-by-person basis; Trish even sends daily Vsnaps to users who respond on Twitter, celebrate anniversaries for involvement with the company, and any other reason to keep people engaged. Putting a face to the conversation, she says, is the whole point.

And she’s not worried about potential competitors, either. I’ve used Vsnap myself, and the difference between a business-oriented video platform and a social one is apparent. In fact, she says Vsnap supports its contemporaries, since it both increases social media activity and also trains users ahead of time in video before they turn to Vsnap. Which, if the brand’s accessibility and functionality is anything to go by, should be sometime soon.

Follow Trish at @TrishoftheTrade!

Class Hangout Review – Midterm paper feedback and fun

Unfortunately, I missed class last week due to other priorities I had at work in Pittsford, NY. I reviewed the recorded hangout and noticed that I missed a great discussion on the midterm paper, analytics and blogger outreach. Overall, the hangout seemed to generate a lot of useful discussion about content generation and what techniques Community Managers may use to keep their members interested.

The Power of Un-popular

The Power of Un-popular

The Mid-term Paper…

For my midterm paper, I chose to write about the book, “The Power of Unpopular” by Erika Napoletano. I approached the project by first creating a general outline of what I wanted to cover with the paper. Once I began reading the book, I kept modifying the outline to include specific information about the subject matter and what I thought of the featured concepts.

Generally, I found the book to be enlightening and quite entertaining. Material was presented in a unique fashion that wasn’t dry and kept the reader interested in what they were reading. After reading several business-related books, I found Erika to be honest and upfront without using a massive amount of jargon to make her point. Her advice was well received by me and I will definitely take her comments to heart when pursuing a new business venture.

I’m unpopular… and I’m okay with that!

Blogger Outreach

Last week we studied blogger outreach and how it can be used to expand a community’s audience. Based on the readings and discussion that occurred on Google+, I found that successful blogger outreach is done by knowing the blog, its purpose, and the author prior to developing a pitch.  Any marketer can create a generic advertisement in an attempt to get a blogger’s attention, but generally a more personal interaction is needed.

Bloggers are experts in their field and have their own audience. Getting a blogger to write for your community can expand your audience, expose you to new partnerships and add value through the knowledge they bring to the discussion. Along with the potential for expanding the audience, a blogger can drive the conversation within your community in a new direction that you may haven’t thought of before, thus making it more interesting for your active participants.

Brand Managers

Another topic that was discussed this past week was brand management – the idea of establishing a voice/personality for your company (or community). There was some discussion about using customers as one of the main ways to promote your brand and the various concerns with this approach. I’m generally on the side of using customers as your main marketing tool because they have the loudest voice.

Overall, great week and I’m looking forward to next week!