Daily Archives: November 26, 2013

Advice for Future Community Managers

On November 19th, our community management class was able to listen in on another panel of community manager experts. This week’s panel consisted of Lea Marino from Cycle For SurvivalTopher Ziobro of Google Local NYC, Jennifer Lopez from Moz, and Sahana Ullagaddi of Klout. Each individual was able to offer different pieces of advice to our class, especially ones who were looking to work as a community manager after graduation. While each panelist was able to add on or agree with what other panelists were saying, each person was able to contribute their own piece of advice based on their own experiences.

Jen Lopez encouraged the ability to plan ahead. Being able to hear information and quickly turn it into something meaningful is an incredible skill. Asking yourself questions like “Is this a big deal?” allows community managers to make things happen. Good community managers know what to do with information they’re given – quickly. If community managers don’t know the answer, they should know who does. Being able to think quickly and think on your feet is invaluable.

Lea Marino stressed the importance of empathy. Although it’s not necessarily something that  can be taught, it’s important to know how to express empathy through digital channels. It’s not enough to through in an emoticon; it’s important to be able to understand what is being said behind those words and smiles. Connecting with people on a deeper level is important. It enhances your communication skills, which are so important to this field.

Sahanna Ullagaddi discussed the importance of wanting to learn. Many people don’t know what they want when they start working in the community management field, so being able to absorb lots of different types of information is important. Being able to hear information and then follow up can make you a great community manager. While learning, it’s also important to share what you think. Having your own voice can make you your own person, and an even better manager.

Topher shares his advice with the class via Google + Hangout

Topher shares his advice with the class via Google + Hangout

Topher Ziobro talked about the importance of energy. Your energy will allow you to take on challenges and express your excitement for something. Social channels need to be energetic throughout the day, and so do you. Projects may run late into the night, and you might have to too! It’s important to keep up that energy and remember that social media doesn’t necessarily end at 5pm everyday.

All of the different pieces of advice that the panelists contributed allowed each member of our class to think about what skills are necessary to be a community manger. Each community manager was able to contribute something different to the table, and all of their advice was incredibly valuable!

Do you have anything to add? Do you disagree with anything? Let us know in the comments below! 

Advice about Community Management from Community Managers

#CMGRclass is slowly coming to a close and what better way to spend the third and final panel than to speak with community managers? This week we heard from Cycle for Survival’s Lea Marino, Google Local New York City’s Topher Ziobro, Moz’s Jennifer Lopez and Klout’s Sahana Ullagaddi.

A quick background on the companies and communities discussed:

  • Cycle for Survival is a company that has indoor cycling bikes where you can raise money for cancer projects that need funding, like raising funds for cures for rare cancer types, through peer-to-peer fundraising. (I never learned how to ride a bike so I’ve never been able to raise money that way, but this sounds perfect for me and I’m hoping they come to Upstate New York.)
  • Google Local NY is a Google+ community that encourages people to explore places around the city.
  • Klout is a company that helps you understand and measure your online influence. (I highly recommend using it, it is a lot of fun.)
  • Moz is an SEO marketing company with analytics software to manage all your inbound efforts.

 

Courtesy of David Armano.

Courtesy of David Armano.

 

So how did our panelists get where they are today?

Marino is a 2008 Public Relations graduate from NewHouse (go ‘Cuse!). She moved to NYC right before the hiring freezes and the economy collapsed but she has since discovered a career path that she is happy with. She wears many hats and works with email marketing, and social media. She also shared a good piece of advice when it comes to internships: you might not always like the internship you’re doing but doing it will help you figure out what you do and do not like so you’re better prepared to search for jobs.

Ziobro started out as a member of the Google+ community he now manages and so he has unique insight into what community memebers want and what a community manager should do. As he says, he gets to “do community in the trusest sense of the word.”

Ullagaddi studied Economics, with a specialisation in International Development, with an original career track to be a Management Consultant. She found herself drawn to careers that would allow her to work and interact with people, “I’m passionate about people, I love people and I wanted a way to interact with people,” so she moved from NYC to San Francisco in order to intern at her mentor’s start-up company.

Lopez has a degree in Journalism and focused on Public Relations. She loves doing web related work, developing and writing code and she also loves speaking in front of people. She came across the world of SEO and became a consultant for Moz. She says that her background in Public Relations has been incredibly helpful, especially when it came to crisis management. She describes Moz as, “everything I love combined into one place.”

Below is a list I put together from a question Kelly Lux, one of our professors and moderators, asked of our panel. Lux wanted to know what traits or skills our panelists thought were the most helpful for a community manager to posses or what they would look for if they were to hire someone:

  • Someone who was able to figure out what to do next, someone who can make stuff happen and someone who can think on their feet. (Lopez)
  • Empathy. It’s not something you can be taught but when it comes to social media or emailing someone you want someone who can has the ability to connect with people; to make sure what you’re saying can be easily read and interpretted. “You read emails how you percieve them to be written, rather than how they were meant to be sent.” (Marino)
  • A hunger to learn. You won’t know anything when you first start out and being excited to learn something new and the ability to recieve feedback, ability to speak up and share your opinions will go far. (Ullagaddi)
  • Be perceptive. Empathy is really important in order to have people open up to you, you need to make them feel comfortable. (Ullagaddi)
  • Energy. How you display it and how you manage it. It shows how interested in something you are and there will be times when you’re going to have to put in a long night. Build reserves so you can tackle a task at anytime of day. (Ziobro)
  • Time management. It’s important to plan things out so you don’t drain yourself. (Ziobro)

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If you are a community manager reading this list, what would you add? Or, do is there something you would take off? Why?

Also: if you’re a student interested in being a community manager but aren’t sure if it’s right for you, consider taking #CMGRclass in the spring 2014 semester.